The Twighlight Zone Square

Scottish people and their darned lack of confidence

Share

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on print
Share on email

IT IS NOT ENOUGH for actors to look good, they need to sound good, as evidenced by the film careers of the beautiful but very flat Elizabeth Hurley or the fetching Gucci model that is Harry Styles based on his latest film (‘Don’t Worry Darling’) where he sounds a little off.

I’m sure Harry and Elizabeth will cope.  But a really great actor needs a really great voice.  Brian Cox has it in spades, as anyone watching him play Logan Roy in HBO’s Succession could testify.  Last night he brought his splendid booming tones to a stage in Edinburgh ‘in conversation’ with Nicola Sturgeon as part of the Edinburgh Book Festival.

Nicola is rather convincing and relaxed as a BBC-type presenter.   And Brian gave a compelling performance as the successful expat back from the USA keen to share his views on Scotland.   And all power to him and his great career.  But Logan Roy he’s not.   If asked about independence, Logan Roy  would not care.   Brian Cox, it would seem, cares a great deal.

Logan Roy would likely say that he longed to get out of Scotland and couldn’t give a monkey’s.  Brian on the other hand is all about independence.  But he shared that he thinks that Scottish people lack confidence in their abilities to rule themselves.  Which, one assumes, explains why they have been giving quite the Nervous Nelly responses during opinion polls on referendums

The suggestion that the Scottish people lack confidence in ourselves as a nation and not, say, confidence in the current administration seems a little shark-jumpy in its logic but give the man and his great voice a break.  Maybe that’s not exactly what he meant.

Modern-speak has possibly led Brian to be confused by what the word confidence now means.  Like the episode The Twilight Zone when a man wakes up one day and finds words have moved around so that ‘car’ now means ‘banana’ and so forth.  Confusing and a little terrifying.  It’s not new for new words to spring up.  Teenagers have always been inventing useful new words for, say, ‘cool’ or ‘very drunk’ etc.   And technology gives us a whole new set of words.  But Twilight Zone word changes are happening now for the old standard bearer language.  In 2022 we are radically changing our definitions.

Remember when woman meant adult female?  Or ‘trauma’ meant horrific, life-threatening experience and remember when we were smug about people getting ‘literally’ wrong?  ‘Woman’ can now in modern-speak mean ‘a feeling’, trauma can mean ‘negative experience and ‘literally’ can now mean ‘really’.   Literally.

And so, our Brian may not know that ‘Confidence’ has jumped this verbal shark too.   We are a lot kinder.  Nowadays a bright child is ‘confident in learning’ and the (harsh) less-bright ‘lacks confidence’.  So Brian says Scottish people “lack confidence” it could sound to the untrained and less kind ear that he was suggesting that if we don’t dig the SNP then we are a bit dim.  Now that does sound like Logan Roy.   

But did Nicola correct Brian Cox and suggest that this national low confidence was maybe more related to a ‘lack of confidence’ in the potential leaders?  You betcha, she didn’t.  She agreed.  We need to be more confident in our abilities.  Forget the boring details.  Vote in the SNP because well, Brian and Nicola would rather have incompetent crew sailing the ship onto the rocks as long as it’s the SNP at the helm.  Independence transcends all.

If you worry about them rocks, then maybe you need to work on yourself.

Sorry Brian, whichever way we go, it is vaguely insulting for you and others like you to return to Scotland, not live with the SNP’s weird philosophies, stupid policies, embarrassing jaunts abroad, their complete lack of responsibility and a mountain of waste in taxes and in the streets.  If you want to pay Scottish tax, watch it getting paid to people who ‘lack confidence’ in running ship-yards, are ‘confident’ in wrecking education, can ‘lack confidence’ in supporting business and are ‘confident’ in making a big mess, then I’d suggest that you would also harbour a little caution.

Or as they used to call it, sense.

If you appreciated this article please share and follow us on Twitter here – and like and comment on facebook here. Help support ThinkScotland publishing these articles by making a donation here.

Share

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on reddit
Share on print
Share on email
Scroll to Top